Alcoholism in Indiana has become a major concern and there is an increasing need for more quality alcohol rehab programs to be located in and around the state. Sometimes, just choosing the right Indiana alcohol rehabilitation can appear to be a daunting task. First, there are various kinds of alcohol treatment, which can include inpatient, outpatient, long term, and short term treatment, and each alcohol rehabilitation facility in Indiana may offer different modalities of treatment, and it can become confusing.

The first step of any Indiana alcohol rehab is the alcohol detoxification process; the goal of detox is to safely manage and minimize the physical withdrawal symptoms that can occur when an alcohol abuser suddenly quits drinking. During the alcohol detox period, an individual from Indiana will receive medical supervision during this difficult process, and the goal of a quality alcohol rehab program is to help to alleviate some of this discomfort. It is only after a person from Indiana has completed the detox process, that they can be fully present for the remainder of the alcohol treatment program. The Indiana alcohol rehab facility should include individual or group counseling sessions. Additionally, one of the most important goals of an Indiana alcohol rehab program is to be able to help the individual to avoid a relapse, by incorporating relapse prevention education into their alcohol treatment process.

The goal of alcohol rehab is significant; to be able to help the person from Indiana that is in rehab for an alcohol addiction to receive the help that they need in order to be able to maintain long term sobriety. It is also the long term goal of a quality alcohol rehab center to be able to help the individual successfully complete all phases of the alcohol rehabilitation in order to have a happy and healthy lifestyle going forward.


Indiana alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. In Indiana, like most states, there has been a decline in drunk driving deaths and in the percentage of total fatalities that are alcohol related in the last twenty years. The most drunk driving deaths occurred in 1986, with 539, while the percentage of alcohol related fatalities peaked in 1982 and 1986 with 52% of the total traffic deaths. In 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 26% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher.

All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon an Indiana police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Indiana, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the Indiana drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals in Indiana who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or pedalcyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

961

504

52

437

46

1983

1,016

505

50

453

45

1984

925

474

51

414

45

1985

974

445

46

379

39

1986

1,038

539

52

453

44

1987

1,055

454

43

379

36

1988

1,099

530

48

461

42

1989

971

447

46

388

40

1990

1,049

485

46

432

41

1991

1,022

493

48

440

43

1992

901

375

42

309

34

1993

901

351

39

288

32

1994

971

353

36

304

31

1995

960

348

36

299

31

1996

984

350

36

297

30

1997

935

331

35

296

32

1998

982

405

41

350

36

1999

1,020

384

38

322

32

2000

886

303

34

246

28

2001

909

320

35

262

29

2002

792

262

33

216

27

2003

834

262

31

223

27

2004

947

299

32

254

27

2005

938

320

34

273

29

2006

896

290

32

247

28

2007

898

267

30

230

26

2008

814

250

31

208

26



2003-2004 Indiana Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

7.51%

[31st of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

14.4%

[29th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

49.9%

[37th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

4.8%

[25th of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

299

[21st of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.477 per 10,000 people

[34th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

32%

[47th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

47.37%

[36th of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Indiana?

  • Non-commercial drivers age 21+ in Indiana are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles in Indiana are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater.
  • Drivers under 21 in Indiana are legally drunk when their blood alcohol measures .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Indiana

  • First-time offenders in Indiana face a driver's license suspension of 90 days to two years.
  • A person who has a previous conviction that occurred more than five years but less than 10 years before faces a driver's license suspension period of 180 days to two years.
  • Those in Indiana who have at least one previous conviction of DUI will be imprisoned for at least five days or required to perform at least 180 hours of community restitution or service. These offenders will also be required to undergo an Indiana alcohol assessment and may be required to attend an Indiana alcohol treatment program.
  • A person in Indiana who has a previous conviction that occurred less than five years of the current violation faces a driver's license suspension of one to two years.
  • A person in Indiana who has at least two previous DUI convictions will be imprisoned for at least 10 days or be required to perform at least 360 hours of community restitution or service. These offenders will also be required to undergo an alcohol assessment and may be required to attend an Indiana alcohol treatment program.
  • A person in Indiana who causes serious bodily injury to another while driving with a BAC of .08 or greater faces six months to three years in prison, as well as a fine of up to $10,000. If the person has a previous DUI conviction within five years, the prison term is between two and eight years. Those who drive drunk and cause serious bodily injury in Indiana face a driver's license suspension of two to five years.
  • A person in Indiana who drives with a BAC of at least .08 but less than .15 faces up to 60 days in prison and a fine of up to $500.
  • A person in Indiana who drives with a BAC of .15 or greater faces up to one year in prison and is subject to pay a fine of up to $5,000.
  • A person in Indiana who has a previous DUI conviction that occurred within five years of the current violation faces six months to three years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000 if the person drove with a BAC of .08 or over while a passenger under 18 was in the vehicle.
  • A person in Indiana who causes the death of another while driving with a BAC of at least .08 faces two to eight years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. If, however, the person has a previous DUI conviction within five years of the current violation, the prison term is six to 20 years. Those in Indiana who drive drunk and cause another person's death face a driver's license suspension of two to five years.
  • A person who causes the death of another while driving with a BAC of .15 or more faces six to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.
  • Where a person's drunk driving causes emergency medical services to be dispatched, the offender will be responsible to make restitution of up to $1,000.

Ignition Interlock

A judge may order any person convicted of DUI in Indiana to equip their vehicle with an ignition interlock system. If, however, the person has a previous conviction that occurred within 10 years of the current conviction, the judge must order the use of an ignition interlock system, unless the offender successfully participates in an alcohol treatment program.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties associated with Indiana's DUI laws, a commercial driver who is convicted of DUI while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from operating a commercial vehicle for one year. If, however, the offender was driving a commercial vehicle and transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is three years. A commercial driver who is convicted of a second DUI in Indiana will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life.

Drivers Under 21

A person under 21 who is convicted of driving with a BAC of at least .02 but less than .08 in Indiana faces a driver's license suspension of up to one year and a fine of up to $500. Underage drivers who commit a DUI with a BAC of .08 and greater may be subject to the DUI penalties applicable to adults.

What is Indiana's Dram Shop Law?

Under Indiana law, a licensed Indiana drinking establishment or a person may be held civilly liable for selling or furnishing alcohol to another with knowledge that the person is intoxicated. Liability may also attach to those who furnish alcohol to a minor with knowledge that the person is under the legal drinking age.

Criminal Liability for Selling or Furnishing Alcohol to a Minor

In Indiana, it is a crime to sell or give alcohol to a minor. Anyone in Indiana who violates this law faces up to 60 days in jail and is subject to pay a fine of up to $500.

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  • Facts
  • Studies have found that greater densities of stores selling alcohol are found in segregated minority neighborhoods.
  • Most wine coolers have as much alcohol as a 12-oz. beer.
  • Sleep disturbances caused by alcoholism include increased time required to fall asleep, frequent awakenings, and a decrease in subjective sleep quality associated with daytime fatigue.
  • Youth exposure to alcohol marketing should also be reduced by lowering the voluntary industry standard governing the placement of alcohol advertising from the current 30% threshold to 15%, based on the proportion of the audience that is age 12-20 years.